Tag Archives: organizational development

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Bridging the Gap in Mindset

image006image007To be really good at transformation the binders must come off.

These two images capture the ‘from’ and ‘to’ of making the mindset shift into an agile, interoperable organization that is capable of continuous transformation.

Each organization has a greater or lesser degree of each mindset and the reason for the identification and discrete definition of the Transformational Organization Paradigm is to provide a platform for assessing the current mindset of the organization.

Characteristics of pre-millennium thinking that are fast becomming obsolete can be described as ‘Industrial Age’ in nature. The degree to which an organization holds to Industrial Age thinking, methods, organizational structures, practices in management and governance, and leadership techniques indicates how large a gap must be bridged to bring the organization into alignment with new-millennium ways of operating.

Moving from Industrial Age thinking through Information Age tactics to New Millennium ideologies is work each pre-millennium business must approach. The Transformational Organization Paradigm and Framework provide a measurable, repeatable way of doing just that.

In this area of the Transformational Organization Framework, employee demographics, prevalent leadership styles, reward and value characteristics are evaluated against the particular industry, business environment and specific transformational pressures the organization faces.

Before an organization can embrace the kind of agility and inter-operability represented in the second image above a number of dicotomies must be resolved within the day to day work context of the balance of employees from the board and executive team to field staff. Below is an example of these.

Industrial Age to Information Age First

In order to bridge the gap in mindset the organization must also address the divide between the ‘business’ side of the organization and the ‘technology’ side of the organization. So as the organization work to bridge the gap in mindset, it must also work to bridge the divide between ‘business’ and ‘technology’.

The common objective is an aligned stride and cadence of organizational agility – in preparation for the next ‘age’ that is coming into view.

 

A New Industrial Revolution is Coming

Over the past 25 years, the Internet has radically altered the way people communicate and share ideas and the way businesses interact with customers and clients.

For an even longer period, starting in the 1950s with the so-called Third Industrial Revolution, businesses have become more digitized. In the next few decades, a new industrial revolution will combine elements of these two trends, along with related technologies and practices, into a truly “smart” manufacturing process.

This convergence is known as the Industrial Internet, Industry 4.0 or the Industrial Internet of Things. Whatever the name, the result will profoundly affect global trade patterns, supply chains and societies. The impact will vary, presenting many opportunities for developed countries to be more disruptive in developing economies and possibly limiting the use of low-end manufacturing for quick modernization and development.

Nonetheless, this Fourth Industrial Revolution will change manufacturing, industry and society.

Read more: https://www.stratfor.com/analysis/smart-factories-next-industrial-revolution#ixzz3cmM7z0Ih

 

Organization Metaphors – Morgan 2006

Here are a set of slides that describe the metaphors posed by Gareth Morgan in 2006 in his book Images of Organisation to describe in more visual terms the types of organizations (culture, value system, and structure).

The central thesis of this book is that all theories of organisation and management are based on implicit metaphor, and that metaphors play a paradoxical role: they are vital to understanding and highlighting certain aspects of organisations, while at the same time they restrict understanding by backgrounding or ignoring others.

Open Slide DeckSlide Deck on Organization Metaphors - Morgan 2006

Meeting the Challenge of Disruptive Change

Why do so many companies fail to innovate successfully?… What’s going on?  After all most companies boast talented people and deep pockets…

Harvard Business Review Report on Disruptive Change

http://www.zurichna.com/internet/zna/SiteCollectionDocuments/en/media/FINAL%20HBR%20Meeting%20Challenge%20of%20Disruptive%20Change.pdf

 

 

Co-Creation Applied – Are You Ready?

Transformation by Co-Creation

Why would you tap into consumer wisdom before you tap your internal experts for advice about how to transform?

For a number of reasons… not the least of which is that your organization may not be ready for the depth of engagement required to transform. Past attempts to mobilize internal wisdom for innovation may have met with crippling ambivalence, or perhaps the imperative for digging deep enough to bring about transformation lacked clarity or may not have been compelling.

Stated in other terms, engaging your consumers in co-creation activities is in part a strategy for breaking though comfortable competency in the status quo, and the associated beliefs and assumptions held in support of the current organizational paradigm and hard-won past success. Consumer co-creation is a way to acknowledge the reality of the consumers’ increasing ability to influence market trends. Managed co-creation can leverage the commitment of your people to dig deeper and apply their wisdom and expertise in new ways toward transformational objectives.

The practice of co-creation has two primary outcomes:  Seeing Value in a new way, and Creating Space where none existed before.

Your customers are ready to co-create… Are you?

SEEING VALUE

Co-creation efforts are aimed at getting to the heart of your relationship with your customers.  In capturing the essential elements of consumer thinking the organization must move on to seeing the intention and intelligence behind them to begin to define ‘value’ anew.  In every sense of the word, the business’s focus must be shifted to understand the value of the consumer-expressed ideas so that they may be internalized by the leaders and makers of transformation. Only then can the ideas be tested against the current organizational paradigm to see what must change in order to align consumer demand and product/service.  And as importantly, to align consumer-expressed value and the way in which the product/service is delivered.

Once the elements of value are seen and understood they can be used to reshape and reorder; embellish, replace and renew the product/service and the systems, processes and human competencies that support their delivery.

This work is more difficult than it sounds as each level of the organization sees the emerging ‘value’ in a different way and all of the perspectives together form the necessary mix for transformation to occur.  You can start anywhere with co-creation as a practice: with the C-Suite, with the customer, with middle management, with staff.  But for co-creation to yield benefits it must eventually be felt by all of these groups in an aligned way.

 

CREATING SPACE

Ingenuity is a function of pressure, and pressure felt in one corner of the organization but not felt in another will result in little traction. As such, efforts to increase customer engagement through co-creation will fail to translate into ‘transformation’ without a corresponding effort to engage staff in the co-creation journey. Like almost anything else we do to grow business, it is best to take an iterative approach to co-creation, so that internal co-creation informs customer co-creation, which in turn, informs and presses internal co-creators to dig deeper, find a new edge.

With support and management, iterative co-creation work forms a part of an ‘ingenuity engine’ between corporation and customer and, under skilled leadership, ignites a synchronized internal ‘ingenuity engine’ that pumps new thought up and down the organization, continuously opening new space for transformation from staff through middle-management to C-Suite, from C-Suite through middle-management to staff.

 

GETTING READY

Making the internal shifts necessary to spark and sustain co-creation requires a good deal of support.  In-flight translation of consumer-expressed concepts demands the ability to leave behind what feels clear, natural and normal in favor of a murky emerging context that is at once individually owned and shared by all participants: a shared presence in design and development (creation), a shared knowledge generation, and a shared value alignment.

Preparing leaders of transformation and the internal participants in co-creation to take in and bring about understanding of foreign-seeming value expressions and then act upon them a way that creates the space for the value to be realized is the challenge that co-creation presents to the organization. A challenge that, when met, mobilizes the organization to deliver newly defined value in a way that can be readily taken up internally, and capitalizes on the consumer interest generated by co-creation.

 

–          Dr. Linda Miller
© iMind Transformation. All Rights Reserved

Transformational Leadership – Sports Journal

Transformational leadership and organizational culture have become increasingly popular topics over the past 10 years. Some researchers have suggested that these topics contain the key to understanding organizational effectiveness (Barney 1986; Bass & Avoilo, 1992). The purpose of this study was to review the related literature on the links between transformational leadership, organizational culture, and organizational effectiveness in sport organizations.

US Sports Academy – Transformational Leadership

Matt Taylor on Organizational Transformation

I take the position that organization transformation is random and the result of
accident and chance. Transformation cannot be made to happen. The
conditions that give rise to it can be understood and they can
be made present in your enterprise. Transformation emerges as the
consequence of many definable and fairly easily created circumstances. It is
neither easy nor difficult. It does take a well designed and persistent effort
over an extended period of time and this is something that few organizations are
willing to sustain. There is no easy path to transformation and a group of
consultants cannot come into your firm and do it for you.

Organizational Transformation – Matt Taylor

 

Organization Theory and the Transformation of Large, Complex Organizations

Since the late 1990s, the transformation of large, complex organizations has become a topic of considerable interest in industry, academia, and government, especially in the context of a global economy linked to increasingly pervasive technology.  Such transformation is understandably of particular interest in the United States because, in many ways, it is defined globally by its enormous and influential government and business organization as well as by the reputation of some of its most prestigious academic ones.

Dissertation: Donald H. Rumsfeld